Older People's Health

The health of older people is an important priority in Oxfordshire and it is a fact that prevalence and incidence of most health conditions rises with increasing age. Cancer, cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease cause a higher proportion of mortality in older than in younger people.

Some of the most common conditions (and associated advice) are outlined below and the Age UK Oxfordshire Community Information Network Directory provides details of activities, support and opportunities across Oxfordshire. Read more here...

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Shingles

Shingles is an infection of a nerve and the skin around it. Shingles usually affects a specific area on one side of the body and does not cross over the midline of the body (an imaginary line running from between your eyes down past the belly button). The main symptom is a painful rash that develops into itchy blisters that contain particles of the virus. From September 1 2015, the shingles vaccine will be offered routinely to people aged 70 and 78. You become eligible for the vaccine on the first day of September 2015 after you've turned 70 or 78, contact your GP Practice for an appointment.

Osteoarthiritis

Osteoarthritis is a condition that causes the joints to become painful and stiff and is the most common type of arthritis in the UK. You should try and stay active and exercise is safe and has real benefits for sufferers.  There is a useful information and exercise sheet available. Read more here...

Hearing

Hearing loss usually happens later in life and occurs gradually, so if you are over 50 it is important to have your hearing tested regularly. In Oxfordshire there are many providers on the High Street who will give you a comprehensive hearing assessment free, and discuss your options if you have hearing loss.

Memory Loss

It's normal to become a bit forgetful as you get older. However, memory loss could be a symptom of something more serious and should be checked by a GP. If dementia is diagnosed then specialist advice is available in Oxfordshire for people with dementia and their carers. Read more here...

Exercise

Physical activity and exercise can help you stay healthy, energetic and independent as you get older. Many adults aged 65 and over spend, on average, 10 hours or more each day sitting or lying down, making them the most sedentary age group. As you get older, it becomes even more important to remain active if you want to stay healthy and maintain your independence. Search the BETTER website for your nearest facility in Oxfordshire. Read more here...

Eyesight

Vision loss among the elderly is a major health care problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65. The most common causes of vision loss among the elderly are age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract and diabetic retinopathy. Regular screening examinations are recommended for all elderly patients. Read more here...

Diabetes

Amongst the elderly population, type 2 diabetes is a growing problem, and a larger proportion of newly diagnosed diabetics are older. Age-related changes can mean that some symptoms will be masked, or harder to spot, so be alert and consult your GP if you have concerns. Read more here...

Cancer

All cancers combined (except non melanoma skin cancer) are more frequent among the elderly than among younger persons (30 to 64 years old) and elderly men have an almost double cancer incidence rate compared with elderly women.  Changes to your body's normal processes or symptoms all need to be checked by a doctor straight away. Read more here...

Heart Disease

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death both in the UK and worldwide. Heart disease generally affects more men than women, although from the age of 50 the chances of developing the condition are similar for both sexes.  Some simple lifestyle changes can reduce your risk. Read more here...

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure (hypertension) means that your blood pressure is continually higher than the recommended level. It rarely has noticeable symptoms. Blood pressure increases with age because the arteries become stiffer and 1 in 4 over 60’s can have high blood pressure. Try and have your blood pressure checked regularly. Read more here...